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January 6th, 2018- The Economist: Thought Experiments

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Brain-computer interfaces sound like the stuff of science fiction. Andrew Palmer sorts the reality from the hype.

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July 14th, 2017- Neural Dust awarded 2017 McKnight Technology Award

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Neural Dust, developed by Professors Jose Carmena and Michel Maharbiz at the University of California, Berkeley, awarded the prestigious 2017 McKnight Technological Innovation in Neuroscience Award

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October 21st, 2016- IEEE Spectrum: 4 Steps to Turn “Neural Dust” Into a Medical Reality

 

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Tiny ultrasound-powered motes could record and adjust nerve activity. Here are 4

challenges that researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are tackling in order to bring this technology into the clinic.

 

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August 8th, 2016- Scientific American: “Neural Dust” Could Enable a Fitbit for the Nervous System

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A technology with the potential to blur the boundaries between biology and electronics has just leaped a major hurdle in the race to demonstrate its feasibility. A team at the University of California, Berkeley, led by neuroscientist Jose Carmena and electrical and computer engineer Michel Maharbiz, has provided the first demonstration of what the researchers call “ultrasonic neural dust” to monitor neural activity in a live animal.

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August 5th, 2016- Newsweek: Electronic “Neural Dust” could monitor your brain- 

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Wireless sensors that can be implanted in a person’s body to control robotic devices have been developed by researchers hoping to transform brain-to-computer interfaces. The “groundbreaking” wireless device is smaller than a grain of rice and could revolutionize prosthetics.

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August 4th, 2016- WIRED: This 1mm sensor could monitor your body in real-time

Tiny implantable sensors that could be used to internally monitor the body without the need of wires have been created by engineers in the US. The devices, created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, could potentially treat disorders such as epilepsy or bladder control and in the future, control prosthetics.

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August 4th, 2016- The Washington Post: Engineers implanted tiny sensors in rats’ nerves and muscles. Are humans next?Image result for the washington post

Sensors the size of a grain of sand could one dayexplain what’s happening in your body from the inside out.

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August 3rd, 2016- Popular Science: Wireless “Neural Dust” Could Monitor Your Brain

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“Neural dust” wireless, implantable sensors are currently only 3 millimeters in length. This new healthcare tech could be even more groundbreaking, as scientists are working to shrink the sensors to microns wide, about the width of a human hair.

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August 3rd, 2016- INDEPENDENT: Tiny implant could connect humans and machines like never before

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A tiny implant the size of a grain of sand has been created that can connect computers to the human body without the need for wires or batteries, opening up a host of futuristic possibilities. The devices, dubbed “neural dust”, could be used to continually monitor organs like the heart in real time and, if they can be made even smaller, implanted into the brain to control robotic devices like prosthetic arms or legs.

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August 3, 2016- UC Berkeley Press Office: Sprinkling of neural dust opens the door to electroceuticals

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UC Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

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July 17th, 2013- TIME: Your Future Brain-Machine Implant: Ultrasonic Neural Dust

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Imagine thousands of particle-sized CMOS chips living in your brain.

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